DO WE WORK FOR TOMORROW?

Sometimes the routine of our work, the repetition of certain tasks associated with our vocational journey seems, well, non-productive.  What do I mean?

You build a house, and when the last nail is driven, deterioration sets in and you fight disintegration year after year. In my case you prepare and preach a sermon, and when the last word is spoken, people forget and a month later, not only do the people forget, but I can’t even remember what I preached on a month ago. And I do this all over again the next week and so it goes. A mom cooks a wonderful meal, spends hours lovingly in the kitchen, and in a matter of moments, especially if you have teenagers, it is all gone. And she must do it all over again. Or take the task of laundry (ok, let’s not go there). You finish that long, arduous  work project at the company, and just when you feel that sense of relief, the boss dumps a new project on you and you start all over again.  If work is seen only in light of the day to day process, we have much cause for despair.

Paul the apostle sheds some light on this matter when he tells us that our labor is not futile when it is expended for the Lord (I Cor. 15:58). Revelation 14:13 speaks of our works following us even after we are gone.  Paul tells us that the people that he invested his life and ministry in were his joy and crown (I Thess. 2:19-20).  These texts made me think about my work as a “tomorrow” thing.  Solomon understood this when he spoke of sowing your seed in Ecc.11:1-6. It is tomorrow that the fruit shows up because we all know or should know that  fruit takes some time to grow. That is why it is called fruit.  I have a favorite saying that has encouraged me many times and that is: “Don’t be discouraged. God is not done yet!” 

So how does this play out practically in our lives as servants of God? I am holding in my hand a book from my father’s library. He has been with the Lord now for over 22 years but I see his notes in the margin and sensed why that passage spoke to him and I realized, though he may not have realized it, he was working for tomorrow, not just today. I am benefiting from his work. I look around at all the “friends” in my library,  most of whom are in glory, and yet they being dead, yet speak! They worked for tomorrow too. These men left a profitable legacy for the rest of us. Their labors live on.

The impact of my life and ministry should be seen to extend beyond today. I witness to my neighbor today yet I see nothing happening. But tomorrow…will that labor of love for Jesus come to fruit? Somehow that puts a fresh perspective on what I do in the here and now.

So just maybe my work by God’s grace and design is meant to encompass tomorrow.  I have today, I don’t have tomorrow…or do I?  Think it thru

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Do our best opportunities come as surprises?

opportunity 1

It was Doug Munton in his little book IMMERSED that talked about what he calls “midnight opportunities” that got me to thinking about those times of witness that pop up most unexpectedly.  He spoke of Paul & Silas, wrongly imprisoned…having a bad day…yet at the end of the day you find them worshiping God in singing and the text says that the prisoners were listening to them. Talk about a surprising opportunity.  Can you image the evangelistic planning meeting Paul’s team had before this? Do you think it went something like this?  Well, guys  when we go to Philippi, lets do something really radical,like healing a demon-possessed girl, ruin some wicked businessmen’s livelihood and then  get ourselves beaten up and thrown in jail. Then about midnight when we get our breath back, let’s have an evangelistic service and sing some special music to draw in the crowd of prisoners and then we will have a preaching service and share the Gospel.  Ludicrous thinking! We know that is not what happened.
But it was at midnight in jail after a rough day’s ministry they decided to talk to God in prayer and break out in spontaneous praise to God when the surprising opportunity happened.  There was an earthquake, the jailer became unglued and was about to commit suicide when Paul stopped him, and shared the good news about Christ and led he and his family to the Lord. I don’t want to minimize the difficulties these guys faced nor overlook the pain and frustration they no doubt felt. But they got their eyes open to where God had put them and what God decided to do right there in that tough, unfair circumstance.

Sometimes my “eyes” don’t see those surprising opportunities because I am too focused on the “jail” or the “mean people” who took advantage of me. Did you ever pray, Lord give me this so I can be a better witness? Then the surprising thing takes place: God takes something away so I can be an even better witness! So back to our question: Do the best opportunities come as surprises? Maybe so! Join me in asking God to keep our eyes open to those unexpected even surprising moments. Think it thru…